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LIFE AgRemSO3il in the LIFE Platform meeting on Waste-Water Treatment

The LIFE-AGREMSO3IL project attended the LIFE Platform meeting on Waste-Water Treatment, held in Barcelona, at the Agbar Water Museum on January 29th-30th 2020. The visit started with a field trip to Barcelona Baix Llobregat WWTP with Cetaqua LIFE projects aWARE, WIRE and ENRICH. AGREMSO3IL project was presented to the event’s audience during the speed presentation poster organized in the first plenary session of the meeting.

 

LIFE AgRemSO3il in the LIFE PureAgroH2O Conference

The LIFE-AGREMSO3IL project atended the 1st LIFE PureAgroH2O Conference, held in Athens on January 17th 2020. This event was hosted by the Benaki Phytopathological Institute and organized in collaboration with the National Center of Research “Demokritos”. LIFE PureAgroH2O project is expected to deliver a novel solution on the purification of agro-industrial effluents and the cost-effective reclaim of the treated water by means of photocatalytic nanofiltration technology for pollutant removal and water re-use of these agro-industrial wastes.

 

 

First results of LIFE AgRemSO3il experiments with small prototype

Initial tests, performed during last year, using a small prototype of the LIFE-AgRemSO3il project have provided “very satisfactory” results, according to Dr José Fenoll, scientific coordinator of the project.
The last essays (May-August 2019) were carried out in pots containing 3 Kg of clay loam soil (2.2% organic matter content, 33.94% clay, 39.87% silt, 26.19% sand) spiked with 33 active ingredients to 1 mg Kg-1 of each one and placed in a greenhouse. Three different treatments were applied to the soil: solarization (placement of a transparent plastic), ozonation + solarization (application of ozone while the soil is covered) and a control experiment was also conducted (without any treatment). The results showed degradations of 49% for control treatment, 69% for solarisation and 82% for ozonation + solarisation.
Regarding the effects on soil microbiota, the foreseen set of analysis was performed for every essay, and the results suggest that the assayed ozone conditions are not harmful in soil. These positive effects will be checked in the following stages of the project at larger scale.

 

                                                   

LIFE AgRemSO3il at LIFE Platform Meeting on Chemicals

The LIFE-AGREMSO3IL project attended the LIFE Platform Meeting on Chemicals held in Vilnius (Lithuania) between 28th and 30th November. This event was hosted by the LIFE project “LIFE Fit for REACH” (LIFE14 ENV/LV000174).

The project participated in the Eco-innovation for reduced production and use of hazardous chemicals workshop with the oral presentation: The silent problem of pesticide residues.

 

LIFE AgRemSO3il at Fruit Attraction 2019

The LIFE-AGREMSO3IL project was represented at the international fruit and vegetable trade show, Fruit Attraction 2019, held at IFEMA, Madrid, between 22th and 24th October.

Project beneficiaries attended the country’s most significant agricultural sector event.

The LIFE-AgRemSO3il project was represented at the trade show by IMIDA and NOVAGRIC.

 

LIFE AgRemSO3il at the International Conference on Catalysis, Advanced Chemical Engineering and Technology

LIFE AgRemSO3il participated in the International Conference on Catalysis, Advanced Chemical Engineering and Technology, ICCA 2019, held in Valencia, Spain, between 5th and 7th September.

Researchers from IMIDA presented the work entitled “Degradation of twelve pesticides in soil by intermittent ozonation treatment”.

 

Experiment in greenhouse with AgRemSO3il small prototype

On August, 2019, it has started the solarization/ozonation experiment in a greenhouse with 8 lysimeters located in IMIDA experimental farm “Torreblanca” (Dolores de Pacheco, Murcia).

 

The soil, which was previously spiked with a mixture of pesticides, will be exposed to both processes during a month. The effects of these technologies in pesticides content, nematode population and soil microbiota will be checked at the end of the essay.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIFE AgRemSO3il at the 6th IDIES congress

Students from IES Juan Carlos I (Murcia) presented the communication “Application of ozonation technique for the removal of thiamethoxam residues in farm soils” in the 6th edition of IDIES congress, held at Auditorio Víctor Villegas (Murcia) on 25thJune. The work was tutored by J. Fenoll (LIFE-AgRemSO3il, IMIDA), M. Aliste (IMIDA) and A.A. Sánchez (IES Juan Carlos I).

IDIES is an educational project of initiation to research focuses in secondary school students. The main objective is that students learn what is research and how must be performed, collaborating with researchers of different institutions. After a training period, students will disseminate their results (via oral and poster communication) in IDIES congress. At the moment it participates 10 secondary schools (from Mazarrón, Murcia, Alcantarilla, San Javier, Molina de Segura, Archena and Lorca) and 5 institutions: 2 research centers (CEBAS-CSIS, IMIDA) and 3 universities (UMU-Murcia, UPCT-Cartagena and UMH-Elche).

LIFE AgRemSO3il at the 3rd International Congress of Chemical Engineering

LIFE AgRemSO3il participated in the 3rd International Congress of Chemical Engineering, ICCE3, held in Santander, Spain, between 19th and 21th June.

Researchers from IMIDA presented the work entitled “Removal of eight triazole and amide pesticides in soil by intermittent ozonation”.

The presentation covers degradation of residues of eight pesticides (difenoconazole, myclobutanil, tebuconazole, triadimenol, cyflufenamid, flonicamid, napropamide and propyzamide) in two different clay-loam soils applying intermittent ozonation treatment during 6 days.


Czech agriculture goes digital as science meets with farmers

Close collaboration between scientists, researchers and farmers has helped agriculture in the Czech Republic to take significant digital steps and increase its competitiveness, analysts told EURACTIV Czech Republic.

An increasing number of Czech farmers have embraced the idea of “producing more with less input” through the application of technology-based precision farming practices.

There are already about 250 milking robots in the Czech Republic. There are also automatic floor cleaners in cowsheds, which suck up the slurry and remove it. This progress is also visible in the Czech fields, with tractors connected to the Internet.

“Czech farmers are the world leaders in using these technologies. Approximately three-quarters of Czech farmers use some of the precision farming systems,” Veronika Hlaváčková, director of the Institute for Agriculture Education, said.

Precise equals ecological?

Analysts suggest that modern technologies will inevitably prevail in the agriculture sector and have a multidimensional role to play in reducing the use of pesticides and bureaucracy for audit authorities.

“We can dramatically reduce inputs thanks to robotization, especially the consumption of pesticides and water,” Vojtěch Kotecký, an environment protection expert, said, adding that robots apply much fewer herbicides and more accurately compared to conventional spraying.

“Although the Czech herbicide consumption fell by 19% between 2009 and 2016, robotics could bring result in even more dramatic drop,” Kotecký said.

The digitisation of the EU farming sector has become a priority for EU policymakers. The European Commission recently submitted to the EU member states a draft declaration titled “A smart and sustainable digital future for European agriculture and rural areas”.

According to the document, EU member states recognise the “urgency” to speed up the introduction of new technologies in order to address increasing challenges related to the environment, economy and society.

Scientists and farmers

The digital revolution in agriculture would never have been possible without research, development and its subsequent implementation. However, linking scientists and farmers is not an easy task.

“So far, the connection between the research sphere and agricultural practice has not been ensured. A number of research projects concerned areas that have not been very useful in practice or on the contrary farmers have been unable to get to useful research results,” Hlaváčková explained.

Almost three years ago, a Technology Platform for Agriculture was established in the Czech Republic, and Veronika Hlaváčková has been the main coordinator.

Thanks to the cooperation and direct communication between farmers and scientists, Czech agriculture is gradually being modernised and refined, she said.

“Over decades, Czech researchers in collaboration with major agricultural machinery manufacturers and Czech farmers have been the creators of many solutions such as sensors, soil probes and work algorithms that help to maintain or improve soil quality. And not just in the Czech Republic,” Hlaváčková said.

Modern technology in agriculture does not only mean the replacement of forks with robots and drones. New ways of growing plants are also being explored so that a crop grows while costs decrease.

The new technology is being tested first with pilot companies, so-called demo-farms, before engaging in the normal agricultural activity. One of them is Bureš Farm where the cultivation of supporting crops is tested.

“A total of 100 hectares of winter wheat are sown on demofarm and surrounding farms with a slug as an auxiliary crop. The stands are being closely monitored and the data are used to verify the research outputs,” said Jindřich Šmöger.

“In agriculture, the result is not visible from one day to another; it is a long-distance run. It is necessary to introduce new technologies in practice, first on smaller areas, then on larger and then of course in different conditions,” Šmöger added.

The potential

Miloslav Klas, the Director of the Agricultural Society Chrášťany, said there was great demand for precision agriculture.

“It is a dynamically developing field where many research teams, both foreign and domestic, operate. Precise farming methods and procedures begin to standardise and are finally prepared in such a way that they can be used effectively for their benefit by a large part of farms in the Czech Republic,” Klas said.

According to him, the development of precision agriculture is also boosted by the fact that most Czech agricultural holdings are led by university level experts.

“There is a new technological stage of agricultural production development ahead of us. It will bring many new opportunities, which would have been difficult to achieve before,” Klas concluded.

[Edited by Sarantis Michalopoulos, Sam Morgan]

 

Source: https://www.euractiv.com/section/agriculture-food/news/czech-agriculture-goes-digital-as-science-meets-with-farmers/